Zhang Yan Poem: Double Rings Unchained · The Lonely wild Swallow – 张炎《解连环·孤雁》

 

解连环
孤雁

张炎
楚江[1]空晚。
怅离群万里,
恍然[2]惊散。
自顾影[3]、
欲下寒塘,
正沙净草枯,
水平天远。
写不成书,
只寄得、
相思一点。
料因循[4]误了,
残毡拥雪[5],
故人心眼。
谁怜旅愁荏苒[6]。
谩长门[7]夜悄,
锦筝[8]弹怨。
想伴侣、
犹宿芦花,
也曾念春前,
去程应转。
暮雨相呼[9],
怕蓦地[10]、
玉关重见。
未羞他、
双燕归来,
画帘半卷。

注释:
[1]楚江:指今湘鄂洞庭湖一带。
[2]恍然:惆怅失意的样子。
[3]顾影:看看水中的身影,对自己的孤独表示怜惜。
[4]因循:原指沿用旧习而不改,这里指孤雁因为离群而耽搁。
[5]残毡拥雪:用苏武拘于匈奴的典故。《汉书·苏武传》:“单于……乃幽武,置大窖中,绝不饮食。天雨雪,武卧啮雪,与毡毛并咽之,数日不死,匈奴以为神。”后苏武借助雁足传书,得以生还。此处似以苏武比喻留滞在北方,被金人俘虏处境艰难的人。
[6]荏苒:指时光的流逝。
[7]长门:汉代宫殿名。汉武帝时陈皇后被弃置幽居的冷宫。杜牧《早雁》:“仙掌月明孤影过,长门灯暗数声来。”
[8]锦筝:精羌的筝。古筝有十二弦或十三弦,斜列如雁行,称雁筝。其声凄清哀怨,故又称哀筝。
[9]暮雨相呼:语出崔涂《孤雁》诗:“暮雨相呼急,寒塘欲下迟。”
[10]蓦地:忽然。
Double Rings Unchained
· The Lonely wild Swallow

Zhang Yan
Over the southern stream at the close of the day,
Suddenly startled, you go astray
And from the row in flight you’re miles away.
You gaze at your own image in the sandy pool
And would alight ‘mid withered grass by water cool.
Alone in the vast sky you cannot form a row,
So like a dot of yearning you should go.
How can you not delay
The message of the envoy eating wool
Mixed with snow!
Who would pity your loneliness?
The queen deserted, companionless,
At quiet night in Palace of Long Gate
Might play pitiful tunes on zither’s string.
You may think of flowering reeds where rests your mate,
Who should come back before next spring.
What if you meet at Gate of Jade again,
Calling each other in the evening rain!
Then you won’t envy swallows in pair,
Flitting by half unrolled curtain of the fair.

注释:
The poet is wellknown for this lyric which describes the lonely wild goose and his own loneliness as well as his friend’s.

《解连环·孤雁》是宋末词人张炎在南宋灭亡后创作的的咏物词。此词描写了一只离群失侣的孤雁独自在江野彷徨的凄苦情景,抒发了作者自己羁旅漂泊的愁怨,委婉地流露出故人之思和亡国之痛。全词将咏物、抒怀、叙事紧密结合,构思巧妙,体物细腻,情意隽永。

This is an aria composed by Zhang Yan at the end of the Song Dynasty after the fall of the Southern Song Dynasty. It depicts the miserable scene of a lonely goose wandering alone in the river and wilderness, expressing the author’s own sorrow of wandering, euphemistically revealing the thoughts of the deceased and the pain of the fallen country. The whole lyric combines chanting, lyricism and narrative, with a clever conception, a delicate body of objects and a timeless sentiment.

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